Latin name: Prunus pensylvanica L.f.
Botanical family: Rosaceae
Growth habit: Tree
Vernacular name(s): pine cherry, bird cherry, fire cherry (Eng.)
cerisier de Pennsylvanie, petit merisier (Fr.)
apueiminanatuk (Montagnais)
wesagatuk (Atikamekw)
bae'wimÓnŻn, kusigwa'kumi'nok (Ojibwa)
maskwetzi'minak (Maletice)
pasuwiymayatik, pasisawimin, pusawemina (Cree)
apueimin‚nakashÓ (Montagnais)
Uses:
Mixed with Taxus canadensis in a tea used for rheumatism [Algonquin: 69].
Bark, fruits, leaves, and roots :Tea taken in fever [Metis 13].
Bark :Tea taken to treat bronchitis, cough and blood poisoning [Algonquin, Cree 69; Innu 72]. Steeped and taken in erysipelas [Malecite 65]. Compress used on swellings and sprain [Montagnais 71].
Bark and branches :Paste, sometimes mixed with Sorbus americana used for problems in shoulders, joints, nerves and heart [Montagnais 71].
Inner bark :Infusion to treat sore eyes [Cree 95]. Used on cuts, a tea drunk for colds, and boiled to a jelly used to treat burns [Algonquin 75]. Used for cough [Ojibwa 87; Montagnais 71].
Wood :Dried without bark and used in prickly heat or chafed skin [Malecite 65].
Roots :Decoction given for stomach pain or disorders [66; Ojibwa 84]. Grated and boiled in water to make a syrup applied to umbilical cord [Atikamekw 73]. Herbal water to treat whooping cough [Cree 93].
Fruits :Eaten raw to fight cough [Montagnais 71].
Leaves or twigs :Used to fight cough [Montagnais 71].